GPS

The GPS (Global Positioning System) receiver uses satellite reception technology to triangulate the user's position without any nearby landmarks, even in foggy or adverse weather conditions. As long as 3 of the 24 or so satellites circling the Earth are visible from your location (they have been placed so that they are, from any point on the planet at any moment), the GPS can calculate your absolute position in XY-coordinates (Latitudinal/Longitudinal), as well as your altitude if 4 satellites are visible. You only need a relatively open view of the sky: under dense forest, at the base of a cliff or blocked by a nearby summit, your reading will be less accurate.
In May 2000, the United States military relaxed its strategic controls over its GPS satellites, improving GPS reception dramatically and allowing accuracy to go from 100 meters to 10 meters for standard models.
The GPS is an indispensable safety and rescue tool, for positioning the location of an injured party, or for getting a lost party back on track, for example.
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